Farnese Palace

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Farnese Palace
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Visit the majestic and sacred buildings, fine palaces, and imposing fortifications built before and during the Renaissance in Rome and other parts of Italy. Renaissance Architecture aimed to revive the classical Greek ideals and Roman forms of antiquity. Although Rome's skyline had yet to include the massive dome of St Peter's Basilica, its seven hills were dotted with ancient ruins and sculpture that fuelled the extraordinary rebuilding of the city under the Renaissance Popes. By the time of Pooe Alexander VI's death, Rome had become the center for the High Renaissance in all of Europe under Pope Julius II.



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Farnese Palace Commentary "Palazzo Farnese", Rome, is the most imposing Italian palace of the sixteenth century. The 56 m (185 ft) façade, occupying the longer side of a spacious piazza, is three storeys tall (recalling Florentine palaces) and thirteen bays wide. It is built of brick with strong stone quoins and has a heavily rusticated portal. Each storey has different window frames (alternating pediments for the piano nobile) placed in dense rows against the flat neutral wall surface, which enhances the sense of scale. The crowning cornice was substantially enlarged by Michelangelo (who also designed the window over the portal) and casts a heavier shadow onto the façade than that envisaged by Sangallo. Sangallo's spectacular three-aisled vestibule (c. 1520-), inspired for example by Roman nymphaea, with its central barrel vault supported on Doric columns, is notable for the sculptural quality of surface."— Sir Banister Fletcher. A History of Architecture. p873.DetailsThe palazzo was begun in 1517, redesigned 1534 and 1541, modified under Michelangelo from 1546, and completed 1589 - details from Sir Banister Fletcher. A History of Architecture.





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